As Host Andy Samberg Prepares, Fox Calls on the NFL to Promote the Emmys

Michael Schneider
Mark Seliger/FOX

Andy Samberg, Emmys

Fox hopes to score a Primetime Emmys touchdown with the help of the NFL.

Fox NFL Sunday will originate from the 67th Primetime Emmy Awards red carpet throughout the day on Sunday, Sept. 20, starting at 12/11c. Fox's late NFL game that day, Dallas Cowboys at Philadelphia Eagles, kicks off at 4:25/3:25c, followed by a post-game show from the red carpet that will then lead straight into the Emmys.

"It's a gigantic day for football," Emmys producer Don Mischer told reporters at the Television Critics Association press tour. "As a producer I'm hoping that game is really tight, goes down the wire, and the winner is not decided until last play. If we're lucky it will go into overtime a minute or two and then throw it to us."

As for the show itself, host Andy Samberg said his writing staff will be led by him and Comedy Bang Bang's Scott Aukerman, with more to come (including potential Saturday Night Live buddies). He worked with Aukerman on the MTV Movie Awards when he hosted that show.

Samberg hinted that he and his Lonely Island troupe, which produced many taped pieces for Saturday Night Live over the years, may have something in store for the Emmys–but he wouldn't promise anything. "They're real busy, in post-production on the movie we just made, so we won't force it if it's not right."

To prepare, Samberg said he was watching more television shows to research the culture of certain shows and their fan bases.

"Doing the show itself is really fun," Samberg said. But it can also be thankless. "I’m just going to try and not look at the Internet for a week afterwards. I think it’s unwinnable that way. But everything is at this point, I'm going into it, going to try to make it as funny as I can make it."

Are awards shows still relevant? Said Mischer, "The honest truth is people still watch award shows. If people stopped watching award shows you'd probably have less of them. When producing an awards show, the [biggest] difference is who wins and what did they say. And as producer you have absolutely no control over that. We hope we'll have unexpected winners, which will make the show more interesting. I think we have a better chance this year. The diversity and inclusiveness of this year's nominees is greater than ever before."

Television Academy head Bruce Rosenblum said he is also looking forward to seeing how the rule change in who votes for outstanding series Emmys (now opened up to the entire voting body, not just a blue ribbon panel) impacts results.

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