Golden Globes 2021 Monologue: How Did Tina Fey & Amy Poehler Do From Opposite Coasts?

Tina Fey Amy Poehler Golden Globe Awards 2021 Monologue Hosts
NBC

“Could this whole night have been an email? Yes.” Tina Fey, cohosting the 2021 Golden Globe Awards with Amy Poehler from opposite coasts, says in the opening monologue.

But just because Fey’s in New York City at the Rainbow Room, and Poehler at the Beverly Hilton, it doesn’t mean that they don’t deliver — even though the monologue can’t help but feel different given the split screen, and cutting to stars Zooming rather than showing celebs live in the haudience. The audience, by the way, is filled with first responders.

Watch Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's Flawless Opening Monologues From Golden Globes PastSee Also

Watch Tina Fey and Amy Poehler's Flawless Opening Monologues From Golden Globes Past

The duo are back to host this year and, seriously, why would an awards show use anyone else?

The cohosts even have fun with the split screen, with Fey “petting” Poehler’s hair. Among their jokes is a breakdown of how to tell the difference between a movie and a TV show, harder than ever since this year “movie theaters were closed and we watch everything on our phones,” as Poehler puts it:

Poehler: “TV is the one I watch five hours straight, but a movie is the one I don’t turn on because it’s two hours. I don’t want to be in front of my TV for two hours. I want to be in front of the TV for one hour five times.”

Fey: “If their fake teeth look real, that’s a movie. If their real teeth look fake, that’s TV.”

Poehler: “If the British actors are playing British people, that’s TV. If they’re playing Americans, it’s a movie.’

Fey: “If you’re like, ‘Mario Lopez is surprisingly good in this,’ that’s TV.”

Poehler: “And if it stars Matthew McConaughey as a poetic drifter, it’s a car commercial.”

Fey: “In movies, it’s called human traffic king. But on TV, it’s called 90 Day Fiancé.”

Fey and Poehler bluntly discuss the Hollywood Foreign Press Association’s lack of diversity — it has no Black members — and acknowledge the importance of inclusivity, and how the organization must change.

What did you think of the bicoastal opening monologue?