'Game of Thrones' Script Reveals Why Drogon Burned the Iron Throne

Meaghan Darwish
HBO

If you haven't heard by now, HBO's megahit Game of Thrones concluded its final season back in May, much to fans' dismay. Now the finale script has been made public following the final episode's Emmy nomination for Outstanding Writing and Directing.

Available for viewing on the Emmys' official website, the script for the finale titled "The Iron Throne" is shedding some new light on previously hidden meaning, particularly that famous Throne-melting scene. As fans will recall, Daenerys' (Emilia Clarke) surviving dragon Drogon took out his fiery rage on the Iron Throne, which had been at the center of the series since the beginning.

Following the death of Daenerys at the hands of Jon Snow (Kit Harington), fans wondered why Drogon didn't kill the guilty party and the answer can finally be found in the script. "Drogon wants to burn the world but he will not kill Jon," reads the directional text of the script.

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But was there more thought behind the burning of the Throne? Apparently not according to D.B. Weiss and David Benioff, who penned the final installment. Within the script's description, the Throne is referred to as a "dumb bystander caught up in the conflagration."

(Credit: HBO)

So apparently Drogon melting the Throne for which his mother died didn't mean much, as it was more of an accident — the Throne was in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Below, see the full scene between Jon and Drogon as written by the showrunners, beginning with Drogon's arrival in the Throne room following Dany's slaying:

(Credit: HBO/Emmys)

So what do you think about the truth behind Drogon's actions? Let us know in the comments below and stay tuned for more Thrones content as the Emmys approach on Sunday, September 22.

Game of Thrones, Seasons 1-8, Available now, HBO GO, HBO Now and On Demand

Emmys, Sunday, September 22, 8/7c, Fox