'Game of Thrones': Did 'Jenny of Oldstones' Foreshadow the Series Finale?

Meaghan Darwish
HBO

[Warning: The below contains MAJOR spoilers for Game of Thrones Season 8 Episode 2, "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms."]

Game of Thrones is no stranger to foreshadowing, and in the show's latest installment, "A Knight of the Seven Kingdoms," a certain song has everyone buzzing.

At the end of the episode, everyone's favorite squire Podrick Payne (Daniel Portman) serenaded his fellow fighters on the eve of the Battle of Winterfell. Sitting by the fire with Jaime (Nikolaj Coster-Waldau), Tyrion (Peter Dinklage), Brienne (Gwendoline Christie), Tormund (Kristofer Hivju), and Davos (Liam Cunningham), Podrick sings "Jenny of Oldstones," as viewers watch a montage of the show's beloved characters on the final night before the battle.

Here's Us Trying to Find the 'Game of Thrones' Ending in That Spotify Playlist

Here's Us Trying to Find the 'Game of Thrones' Ending in That Spotify Playlist

Showrunners David Benioff and Dan Weiss say the playlist contains a massive spoiler about the series ending.

As fans of the show know by now, Game of Thrones utilizes songs in a deeper way than just background music. Throughout the seasons, "The Rains of Castamere" has been used to represent the Lannisters. Most famously, that song signaled the deaths to come during the Red Wedding.

Now, "Jenny of Oldstones" is being deciphered as a hint at who may take the Iron Throne in the end... if they survive.

(Credit: HBO)

According to Westeros history from George R. R. Martin's books, Jenny of Oldstones was the wife of Duncan Targaryen, who was known as the Prince of Dragonflies. Ultimately, Duncan relinquished his right to the Iron Throne to marry Jenny, and instead, his brother Aerys (aka The Mad King) — Jon's grandfather and Daenerys' father — took the coveted Throne.

Now, the song which has been released by Florence + the Machine, is calling into question the show's final outcome. When Jon (Kit Harington) revealed his true heritage to Daenerys (Emilia Clarke) at the end of the episode, she was skeptical, but could his chances of taking the Throne as its rightful heir be squashed? We could definitely imagine Jon giving up his reign for her as he didn't show any interest prior to this earth shattering revelation that he's Aegon Targaryen.

(Credit: HBO)

Does this mean Daenerys will be the one to take the Iron Throne? Nothing is for certain when it comes to this final season, but the song could also be teasing a different Stark taking control. As stated above, Duncan Targaryen was the Prince of Dragonflies and there's one character who has worn dragonflies repeatedly throughout the series — Sansa (Sophie Turner). So the song could very well be hinting at her destiny.

The lyrics (below) hint at a lonely point in time long after many of Jenny's loved ones had perished. And in their absence she wouldn't leave the "halls of the kings who are gone."

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From Arya and Jon in the 'Game of Thrones' Season 8 premiere to Jamie and Claire in 'Outlander' Season 3.

High in the halls of the kings who are gone
Jenny would dance with her ghosts
The ones she had lost and the ones she had found
And the ones who had loved her the most

The ones who'd been gone for so very long
She couldn't remember their names
They spun her around on the damp old stones
Spun away all her sorrow and pain

And she never wanted to leave, never wanted to leave
Never wanted to leave, never wanted to leave

They danced through the day
And into the night through the snow that swept through the hall
From winter to summer then winter again
Til the walls did crumble and fall

And she never wanted to leave, never wanted to leave
Never wanted to leave, never wanted to leave
And she never wanted to leave, never wanted to leave
Never wanted to leave, never wanted to leave

High in the halls of the kings who are gone
Jenny would dance with her ghosts
The ones she had lost and the ones she had found
And the ones who had loved her the most

Ultimately, it's up to viewers to decipher its true meaning, but there's certainly a lot to think about. Hear the haunting rendition by Florence + the Machine below, and feel free to sound off in the comments about your interpretation of "Jenny of Oldstones."

Game of Thrones, Sundays, 9/8c, HBO