Late-Night Hosts Take Jabs at Donald Trump's Spectacular Press Conference (VIDEO)

Tamara Fuentes
Andrew Lipovsky/NBC

Pictured: Host Jimmy Fallon as President Donald J. Trump on February 16, 2017

President Donald Trump held his first solo press conference Thursday following a tumultuous first month in office. During the 77-minute conference (which you can watch in full thanks to the New York Times), Trump denied recent insinuations about his relationship with Russia, including the resignation of National Security Advisor Michael Flynn; trumpeted his (false) claim that he secured the greatest number of electoral votes since Ronald Reagan; lashed out at the media for reporting "fake news" about real leaks; and briefly mentioned that his pick for Labor Secretary, Andy Puzder, removed himself from consideration.

Needless to say, late night hosts had a field day with one of the most bizarre presidential press conferences in history.

Here's a roundup of late-night's hosts doing what they do best:

Late Show with Stephen Colbert

"This was just him by himself. Evidently, he didn't even bring his meds with him."

The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon

"Welcome. Welcome. Thank me. Thank me. And buckle up, because I'm coming in hot. Daddy came to play."

Late Night with Seth Meyers

"So, our show tapes at 6:30 and usually we start writing 'A Closer Look' the night before. By 1 p.m. today we had a draft about Republicans' attempts to appeal Obamacare that we felt good about, and then Donald Trump held what can only be described as a bats--t crazy press conference that rendered this script completely meaningless."

Jimmy Kimmel Live!

"He talked for an hour and 17 minutes, which is more than he's spoken to Melania all this year."

The Late Late Show with James Corden

"That's how bad things are in the Trump administration right now. Someone asks you if you'd like to work in the White House and you're like, 'No, thanks. I'd rather work at Carl's Jr.'"

Trevor Noah

"If you can't trust your president to get the right information on a Google-able fact, then can you really trust him with the harder stuff?"