Nick Gehlfuss on This Week's Intense 'Chicago Med' & Hope for #Manstead Fans

Ileane Rudolph
Preview Elizabeth Sisson/NBC

The Chicago P.D. should have a permanent outpost at Gaffney Chicago Medical Center. On Wednesday, April 24, another act of terror takes over Chicago Med.

"We have an active shooter who holds medical staff hostage, and the hospital goes into lockdown," says Nick Gehlfuss, whose Dr. Will Halstead already has PTSD after nearly being executed by the son of an ailing mobster. (Wiseguy Jr. found out the doc was informing on his criminal patient to the cops.)

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The crisis spurs an evacuation, leaving behind only emergency personnel and their sickest patients — among them, Dr. Connor Rhodes's (Colin Donnell) deservedly estranged multimillionaire father (D.W. Moffett) — along with very few medical supplies. 

Will, meanwhile, is almost out the door when he sees his former fiancée, Dr. Natalie Manning (Torrey DeVitto), cornered by the shooter, a teen who wants to prevent his pregnant ex-girlfriend from having their child adopted.

(Credit: Elizabeth Sisson/NBC)

"Will [has been pretending] to be moving on from Natalie," says Gehlfuss, "but seeing her with a gun to her face stirs up a lot of memories, especially because he's been working through his own experience of gun trauma. William means protector [in German], and he is one."

So, is there hope for #Manstead fans? Even though Natalie has a new beau, Phillip (Ian Harding), and Will is getting close to FBI agent Ingrid Lee (Anna Enger Ritch), Gehlfuss teases, "I think there is."

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The actor is more forthcoming about how he de-stresses while filming episodes as intense as this one. Therapy and meditation help, he says, but so does laughing on set. "There is inevitably a moment where someone has to spout a new medical term and they make a fool of themselves," he says. "We all love that — and we're thankful for it."

Chicago Med, Wednesdays, 8/7c, NBC