Jon Stewart Talks Daily Show Retirement and Donald Trump Following Emmy Win

Rob Moynihan
FILE - This Nov. 30, 2011 file photo shows television host Jon Stewart during a taping of "The Daily Show with Jon Stewart" in New York. The 18th edition of "Bartlett's Familiar Quotations," has just been released, the first for the electronic age and a chance to take in some of the new faces, events and catchphrases of the past 10 years. General editor Geoffrey O'Brien says he has expanded upon the trend set by his predecessor, Justin Kaplan, of incorporating popular culture into an anthology once known for classical citations. Shakespeare and the Bible still reign, but room also has been made for Steve Jobs, Madonna and Michael Moore, Justin Timberlake and Jon Stewart. (AP Photo/Brad Barket, file)

It's been over a month since Jon Stewart bid farewell to The Daily Show with a rollicking final episode featuring returning guests and a performance by Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band. But the comedian was back in the spotlight on Sunday night when he and his team were awarded two primetime Emmys for Outstanding Variety Talk Series and Outstanding Writing for a Variety Series. After accepting the award, the former host revealed his retirement plans to reporters backstage.

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"If I had known what life was like on the other side, I would have left earlier," Stewart said. "It's f---ing fun, man. You can get a smoothie at 2!"

Stewart was adamant he does not have any immediate plans, and nothing could get him back in the hosting seat, not even a Donald Trump presidency.

"I would consider getting into a rocket and going to another planet because clearly this planet's gone bonkers," Stewart said. "I may just end up on a boat somewhere floating out onto an island."

As for his successor Trevor Noah, Stewart promises he'll be there for support, but he will not be actively involved in any day to day decisions. "Trevor is such a talented guy and has such a great foundation for this," Stewart said. "The last thing they need is the old pope peering around at the new pope going, 'Is that how you're going to bless the wafer?'"