Wayne Brady on If We'll See Him Back on 'Bold and the Beautiful'

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Patrick McElhenney/CBS

Wayne Brady, at the moment, has more in the works "than your average person" in Hollywood.

And he's focusing on the future rather than looking to revisit his past roles. "I think all of the stories I've been a part of have reached very great endings," he tells TV Insider. "Like on How I Met Your Mother, I loved playing James, but the show came to a wonderful ending and I feel like James' ending was wrapped up."

The same holds true for his role as Dr. Reese Buckingham on The Bold and the Beautiful. "That was a great moment and I did it for a specific reason in that time," he explains. "They say you never say never, so I won't say never, but I have no plans to return because I feel it wrapped up and people loved it. You can never recapture the thing people liked the first time."

And looking ahead, in addition to his recurring role as Gravedigger on Black Lightning in 2020 and his continued work on Let's Make a Deal, he has some other projects in the works, including producing a teenage improvisational competition and a CBS All Access drama. With the former, "I'm taking triple-threat kids like myself when I was a kid, and teaching them sketch and comedy and seeing who grasps the concepts best," he previews.

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The multi-talented star also discusses what he enjoys about hosting 'Let's Make a Deal.'

Brady's also devoting time to his music, from a new project at the beginning of 2020 to finishing up a run in Freestyle Love Supreme on Broadway. "I'm creating music all of the time on stage and in front of people, off the top of the head and it's improvisational and it's funny, but it's also really real music," he says.

As for his thoughts on the multiple singing competition shows on TV, he's all for "anything that gives talent a chance to be rewarded instead of just straight-up reality show nonsense."

He adds, "I think too many people in show business are rewarded for not being talented, they are rewarded for their own personal story and for being crazy as opposed to hey, you actually have a talent."

"More than your average person," indeed.