The ‘DuckTales’ Bosses on Why the Finale Won’t be the Last of the Daredevil Crew

Finale
Disney

After three seasons, Disney’s beloved show about fun-loving waterfowl will stop ducking around.

On Monday, March 15, the animated series DuckTales about the miserly Scrooge McDuck (voiced by David Tennant) and his mischievous triplet grandnephews (voiced by Danny Pudi, Ben Schwartz, and Bobby Moynihan) that drew a new generation to Duckburg, will wrap up their adventures with a 90-minute star-studded special.

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Co-executive producers Matt Youngberg and Francisco Angones created DuckTales in 2017 as a love letter to the 1980s series of the same name. “We were diehard Duck fans,” Angones tells TV Insider.

Although the reboot is bolder than its predecessor (which Angones calls the “original comedy adventure series [that] built the template for all comedy adventure series even to this day”) and undeniably modern, it oozes with nostalgia. It’s clear that the duo sought to endear the characters they love to a new crop of viewers — and mission accomplished. DuckTales amassed a devoted fanbase, accruing over 234 million views on social media and YouTube, and became the No. 1 ratings driver on Disney XD, the network boasts.

Now, the motley ensemble of daredevil ducks — voiced by a high-octane cast of comedy greats that includes recurring guest stars like Lin-Manuel Miranda (Gizmoduck) — take on their greatest challenge yet. In the final episode, the Duck crew goes head-to-head with the Fiendish Organization for World Larceny (F.O.W.L.). Fans will enjoy shocking revelations about F.O.W.L. and family that will bring new meaning to their escapades. The stakes are high: which team triumphs will determine the fate of adventuring forever.

Disney

Behind the scenes, the DuckTales team faced a nemesis of their own: the pandemic. But as is often the case with the ducks, teamwork and enthusiasm saved the day. “The tools changed a little bit,” says Youngberg. “But we were making that show regardless.” Determined to complete the season as they had planned, Angones and Youngberg moved production to the cast and crew’s homes. “To the credit of the whole team and Disney, we pulled off a mighty feat — the size and scope of this finale is no joke. And we didn’t hold back,” the latter adds.

After 75 episodes and more than 15 shorts, Angones and Youngberg are wrapping up this chapter of the DuckTales story, but they insist this isn’t the last you’ll see of the ducks. “So many of these characters were around before we were born. Hopefully they will still be around after we’re done,” Angones says. The co-executive producer expressed his desire to “never close the door” to the DuckTales universe and to keep kindling the love for the ducks that the original series sparked in him.

Disney

Like every episode, DuckTales’ finale is jam-packed with jokes. But one stands out, and it happens to be one of the creators’ favorite moments. In a high-intensity scene, Gyro (Scrooge McDuck’s sassy inventor, played by Jim Rash) delivers a verbose instruction to the triplet ducks.

“Reverse the polarity on the triple-wired coupling!” he says.

“We’re children!” they whine in response. Ultimately, the ducks complete the task. And as they walk away, Gyro mutters to himself: “When they do something good ‘we’re heroes!,’ but when it gets a little hard, ‘we’re children.’

It’s a moment that encapsulates the core belief DuckTales preaches: No one is too old to have fun, and no one is too young to save the day. And that’s a message that deserves an encore.

DuckTales, Series Finale, Monday, March 15, 7/6c, Disney XD (and ungated in DisneyNow)

This Duckburg Life, Podcast Premiere, Monday, March 29, Disney XD YouTube, DisneyNOW and Disney XD VOD