3 Tales From Nat Geo WILD's 'Jungle Animal Rescue'

Jungle Animal Rescue
Preview
National Geographic/Double Act

Leopards and tigers and bears? Oh, my! When it comes to the animal kingdom, India has it all — which makes the work of the Wildlife SOS conservation sanctuary crucial. "India is home to one of the richest and most diverse ecosystems on the planet," says Jungle Animal Rescue exec producer Pam Caragol. "But it's also home to 1.3 billion people who compete with wildlife for living space."

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In this new docuseries, cameras track the SOS team's often perilous efforts to rescue and rehabilitate creatures big and small. Here are a few memorable tales from the opener.

1.

Animal Jungle Rescue

(Credit: Double Act/National Geographic)

A macaque monkey who was shot and left paralyzed is tended to by vet Paul Ramos and SOS's director of conservation projects Baiju Raj (above, first and second from left). Post-op, the li'l guy is set to be released into the sanctuary, where he can play safe from harm.

2.

SOS cofounder/CEO Kartick Satyanarayan (below) oversees the mission to free a malnourished and injured elephant being used for begging. Once safe, the lonely gentle giant (Kalpana, top left) meets another pachyderm (Holly, top right) for the first time ever and forms a sweet bond that touches the entire staff.

Jungle Animal Rescue

(Credit: Double Act/National Geographic)

3.

Workers respond to reports of a venomous cobra hiding out in a classroom. It was a dangerous situation for everyone, but the crew "carefully followed the pros' lead and their rules about how to stay safe amid wild animals," notes Caragol. Later, the snake's immediate acclimation when it's relocated to the jungle is kind of cute. In a slithery, scaly way.

Jungle Animal Rescue, Series Premiere, Saturday, April 18, 10/9c, Nat Geo Wild